Tag Archives: Shirt

Sheer Shirt

Have you ever had a pattern and you don’t know why you bought it?

I was looking through some of my pattern stash recently, and I have to say that it is quite considerable now, when I came across this one, New look 6305. I don’t quite know why I collect so many patterns. I think it is a bit like people who like books knowing that they can not possibly read them all but they just have to own them. I know that I will never have the time to make everything that I want to sew but some how owning the patterns is inspiring and keeps the sewing juices flowing.

Sheer Shirt Pattern image
Sheer Shirt Pattern

Getting back to New Look 6350, I don’t recall acquiring such a boring looking pattern with such an ugly envelope picture. However, I thought that I would set myself a little challenge to make a wearable and possibly even fashionable garment from this uninspiring look.

The fabric I’ve used is a patterned sheer, which has been in the stash for quite some time waiting for it’s turn at the sewing machine.

Sheer Shirt Bust Dart image
Sheer Shirt Bust Dart

The seams are all sewn as french seams so that all the edges are encased and will not fray. This also looks nice as of the seams are visible from the outside of the sheer, see through fabric. The only seam which is not a french seam is around the sleeve head which I could have stitched as a flat felled seam, however I attached as usual then serged to lock the two layers of fabric together. In the finished photographs I think it looks neat enough.

I traced off the pattern pieces for view C on the packet picture. I did this instead of cutting out the actual paper pattern itself because I was not sure if I would be cutting it about and restyling the pieces . In the end though after making a toile from a piece of cotton sheeting fabric which I buy just for this purpose, it was decided to simply lengthen the bodice and slightly reduce the width of the edging band. I also did not put the cuff band onto the sleeves as they were long enough already and the cuff made them look too heavy for the sheer fabric.
The sleeves now finish at the same point as the bodice hemline.

Sheer Shirt Front image
Sheer Shirt Front
Sheer Shirt Side image
Sheer Shirt Side

Sheer-Shirt-Back-5536

My assessment of the final shirt is that I shouldn’t be too quick to judge a pattern and just because the picture on the packet looks a bit dated it only needs a small helping of inspiration to nudge it back into fashion. It is a very easy top to wear. I think it would be very comfortable and up to date made from a sweatshirt fabric, maybe grey or another neutral tone. It would also work in cotton, silk, denim or something with a bit of stretch like a ponte roma.

I guess I shall have to create a dress next from the rest of the pattern.

Sheer Shirt Front image
Sheer Shirt Front

Gingham Shirt

I am so excited about posting this blog because I have been planning and thinking about my gingham month for weeks now and it’s finally here. I’m overlapping my shirt sewing with the gingham sewing too, to make things extra special in this blog!

I thought long and hard about using cotton Gingham as a fashion fabric.

Gingham-Shirt-Front image
Gingham-Shirt-Front

We are used to seeing it in children’s wear and in vintage clothing, Julie Andrews in the wizard of Oz, but is it really a sophisticated fashion forward look? Then I noticed that quite a few of the big name designers like Diane von Furstenberg, Alexander Mcqueen, and Chloe had created beautiful dresses from the little chequered fabric.

If it’s good enough for them, then it’s good enough for me!

 

Gingham Fabric image
Gingham Fabric
Shirt Pattern image
Shirt Pattern

I have used a commercial paper pattern for this sewing make. It is New Look number 6232 which I have modified a bit to give a looser feel to the shirt. It is a very useful pattern which I can recommend as I have had it a few years now and it has been tried and tested in a few different sizes by me for myself and other family members. I made it in a size US 8/ UK 12.

Gingham-Shirt-Back image
Gingham-Shirt-Back

I have left out the darts in the back to create a bit more fullness so it is less tight across the back of the body. This is a casual look for me, not a smart office or interview type of shirt. I changed the way that the yoke is constructed too, by cutting out and using only one yoke piece instead of two and sewing it together in more of a dressmaker fashion rather than tailoring the shirt for a man, more of a relaxed blouse. I tend to stay away from pocket placement on the front of my tops as they tend to sag, even when not used, and this is definitely not a flattering look for anyone!

Gingham-Shirt-Front image
Gingham-Shirt-Front

As I am sure you can see from the photos, I have changed the cuffs as in the Easter shirt, by cutting the sleeve about six inches shorter and adding a simple cuff band instead of the conventional cuff with buttons. I think this is much more flattering. I have previously made this same shirt with a little cap sleeve too and that would have worked well in this fabric.

I chose the bright pink buttons for the front of the shirt to set off the pink in the check more. One little tip I have when you are positioning the buttons on the front of a shirt or blouse you are making, is to put it on when you mark the position of the buttons and buttonholes so that you get them in the correct place for you rather than the recommendation on the pattern diagram. I rarely wear my shirts buttoned up to the top, so think about how you will wear the shirt, and then decide how open you want the neck to be as well. If you place the fastening too high, you might feel choked, or too low, you could feel too exposed, you won’t wear the shirt because you won’t feel comfortable in it.

Gingham-Shirt-Happy-Sewing image
Gingham-Shirt-Happy-Sewing